Frank Ocean - Thinkin Bout You
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124:

Frank Ocean - Thinkin Bout You

nya-kin:

adonis bosso

NICKI MINAJ - ANACONDA HQ
48,062 plays

onetrackheart:

HIGH QUALITY VERSION OF ANACONDA

jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.

These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.

Yeah.

They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.

These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.

And the metro is always this clean.

In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.

Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.

We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.

fnhfal:

Cossacks

i get paid today for doing some kid’s homework should i buy the last of us????

in the beginning of that curved tv commercial, it sounds A LOT like the ps3 start up so i was really confused as to who started up my ps3 and changed the channel to hdmi with no one else in the room

*wishes bryan cranston were me dad*

"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.’

vogue:

It takes two to tango. http://vogue.cm/1ol9EpBA$AP Rocky and Chanel Iman in the September Issue photographed by Mikael Jansson, September 2014.

vogue:

It takes two to tango. http://vogue.cm/1ol9EpB

A$AP Rocky and Chanel Iman in the September Issue photographed by Mikael Jansson, September 2014.

meadham kirchoff aw/14, photography by rosaline shahnavaz.

historicaltimes:

Soldier buying a ticket to the Leningrad premiere of Shostakovich’s Seventh Symphony, 1942
AntonRubinstein:



The Leningrad première of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7 occurred on 9 August 1942 during the Second World War, while the city of Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) was under siege by Nazi German forces.
Dmitri Shostakovich had intended for the piece to be premièred by the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra, but because of the siege that group was evacuated from the city, as was the composer himself. The world première of the symphony was held in Kuibyshev with the Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra. The Leningrad première was performed by the surviving musicians of the Leningrad Radio Orchestra, supplemented with military performers. Most of the musicians were starving, which made rehearsing difficult: musicians frequently collapsed during rehearsals, and three died. The orchestra was able to play the symphony all the way through only once before the concert.
Despite the poor condition of the performers and many of the audience members, the concert was highly successful, prompting an hour-long ovation. The concert was supported by a Soviet military offensive, code-named Squall, intended to silence German forces during the performance. The symphony was broadcast to the German lines by loudspeaker as a form of psychological warfare. The Leningrad première was considered by music critics to be one of the most important artistic performances of the war because of its psychological and political effects. The conductor concluded that “in that moment, we triumphed over the soulless Nazi war machine”. Reunion concerts featuring surviving musicians were convened in 1964 and 1992 to commemorate the event.

Leningrad première of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7

historicaltimes:

Soldier buying a ticket to the Leningrad premiere of Shostakovich’s Seventh Symphony, 1942

AntonRubinstein:

The Leningrad première of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7 occurred on 9 August 1942 during the Second World War, while the city of Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) was under siege by Nazi German forces.

Dmitri Shostakovich had intended for the piece to be premièred by the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra, but because of the siege that group was evacuated from the city, as was the composer himself. The world première of the symphony was held in Kuibyshev with the Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra. The Leningrad première was performed by the surviving musicians of the Leningrad Radio Orchestra, supplemented with military performers. Most of the musicians were starving, which made rehearsing difficult: musicians frequently collapsed during rehearsals, and three died. The orchestra was able to play the symphony all the way through only once before the concert.

Despite the poor condition of the performers and many of the audience members, the concert was highly successful, prompting an hour-long ovation. The concert was supported by a Soviet military offensive, code-named Squall, intended to silence German forces during the performance. The symphony was broadcast to the German lines by loudspeaker as a form of psychological warfare. The Leningrad première was considered by music critics to be one of the most important artistic performances of the war because of its psychological and political effects. The conductor concluded that “in that moment, we triumphed over the soulless Nazi war machine”. Reunion concerts featuring surviving musicians were convened in 1964 and 1992 to commemorate the event.

Leningrad première of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7


Maison Martin Margiela F/W 13

Maison Martin Margiela F/W 13